Skip to main content

Evaluating News Sources

In this guide, you will find information, tools, and tips to evaluate and verify fact-based news sources.

The influx of hoax news shared on social media has been brought to the national spotlight. While promoting hoax news has been around for quite some time (see this article on England demoralizing the Nazi troops with false radio broadcasts), the internet has created an abundance of realistic sites promoting false or misleading articles.

Loading...

Loading...

Accessible View

The influx of hoax news shared on social media has been brought to the national spotlight. While promoting hoax news has been around for quite some time (see this article on England demoralizing the Nazi troops with false radio broadcasts), the internet has created an abundance of realistic sites promoting false or misleading articles.


Examples of Information Types

Hoax News

  • Deliberately false, misleading stories presented as factual information

  • Hoax news headlines fool American Adults about 75% of the time*

Satire

  • In which topical issues, folly, or evil are held up to scorn by means of ridicule and irony.

  • The Onion is an example of news satire

Propaganda

  • A communication deliberately designed by one group to influence the attitudes and behaviors of others

  • Appeals to emotional and irrational aspects of our sensibility

Opinion

  • A view, judgement, or appraisal formed in the mind about a particular matter

  • Might be labeled Op-Ed in newspapers or online sites

Advertising

  • To call attention to product/services by emphasizing desireable qualities so audience will buy or patronize

  • Might be labeled as Sponsored Content

News

  • Information about recent events or happenings, presented without commentary

  • Does not stand for Notable Events, Weather, and Sports

Bottom Line
Information shouldn't try to persuade you or appeal to your emotions. News is not commentary. No opinion should be offered when presenting it.